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labphoto:

When hot, molten antimony is poured on a cold surface it will ignite and spill in every direction producing a lot smoke what contains mainly antimony trioxide.
However it looks great and it is an awesome demonstration experiment.

labphoto:

When hot, molten antimony is poured on a cold surface it will ignite and spill in every direction producing a lot smoke what contains mainly antimony trioxide.

However it looks great and it is an awesome demonstration experiment.

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jtotheizzoe:

The world looks better through a scientific lens. According to the 2014 Wellcome Image Awards winners, anyway. Here’s my favorites:

  • At top we see the cross-section of a lily flower bud by Spike Walker, perfectly illustrating the ordered anatomy of a bloom, from eggy ovules to spermy stamens to beautifully bundled petals and sepals.
  • Next, we see a pair of wee monsters, an electron micrograph image of a louse embedded on a human hair, by Kevin Mackenzie, and a zebrafish embryo, all eyes on you, by Annie Cavanagh and David McCarthy.
  • Next we see the false-colored silver oxide flowers that “grow” from stems of calcium carbonate after agricultural sludge is burned at high temperatures, from Eberhart Kernahan. Next to that is a rather painful-looking kidney stone that could be mistaken for an alien moon, by Kevin Mackenzie.
  • Finally, an x-ray of a bat, by Chris Thorn, reminding us that the wings of those much-maligned mammals are just really big webby hands.

Check out the full winners’ gallery here.

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thegildedcentury:

Life, August 9, 1948

thegildedcentury:

Life, August 9, 1948

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(Source: humanoidhistory, via s-cientia)

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carlzimmer:

Whales produce echolocation with strange muscles and tissues around their noses. At the Loom, I write about how it all evolved. Art by Keith Kasnot/National Geographic

carlzimmer:

Whales produce echolocation with strange muscles and tissues around their noses. At the Loom, I write about how it all evolved. Art by Keith Kasnot/National Geographic

(via scientificillustration)

Photoset

Black Hole is a series of images, which shows paint modeled by centripetal force. The setup is very simple: Various shades of acrylic paint are dripped onto a metallic rod, which is connected to a drill. When switched on, the paint starts to move away from the rod, creating these amazing looking structures.” -Fabian Oefner.

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milesian:

Dancing in the dark
Three views of one animal look like a magical dancing sprite in the night sea. A relative of the Man-o’-War, the predatory siphonophore Rhizophysa, is four inches high when contracted (middle) but its stinging tentacles stretch to a couple of feet when fishing. 

milesian:

Dancing in the dark

Three views of one animal look like a magical dancing sprite in the night sea. A relative of the Man-o’-War, the predatory siphonophore Rhizophysa, is four inches high when contracted (middle) but its stinging tentacles stretch to a couple of feet when fishing. 

(Source: science-is-everything, via s-cientia)

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nevver:

This cartoon just made a scientific breakthrough
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Photoset

2headedsnake:

Rebecca Stevenson

(Source: rebeccastevenson.net, via staceythinx)

Photoset

ianbrooks:

Worms Renaissance photos by Alexander Semenov

Artist: Behance / Flickr / Website

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giftsofnature:

Pyrite by Geological Curators’ Group on Flickr.
Photoset

Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

(Source: yesknopemaybe, via s-cientia)

Photoset

devidsketchbook:

RADIOLARIA INDEX BY CHAOTIC ATMOSPHERES

Chaotic Atmospheres (behance) Topologically Generated Radiolaria - "I’ve been requested by Neonmob (a trading-card social network), to make a big set of more than 100 pictures. As I had freedom on the subject, I searched for base shapes that I could vary sufficiently so there’d be a relationship, and yet each shape would be different from all the others. I ended up representing an index of fake radiolaria inspired by SEM imagery and the incredibly detailed illustrations of Ernst Haeckel." [ Read More ]

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How to Measure a Cheshire Grin? Illustration by Jonathon Rosen.