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scientificvisuals:

To harvest silk from a Golden Orb Weaver (Nephila edulis), the Oxford Silk Group sedates a spider with carbon dioxide gas and pins it down harmlessly. A technician extracts silk from the spinnerets with tweezers and glues the thread to a motorized spool. Once fired up, the motor can draw out  30-80 meters of silk in one session.

In case you’re worried, the spider is fine afterward. Read more at the source.

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scientificvisuals:

Liquid nitrogen in a vacuum. Best explained here. Source here. Seen via IFLS.

Img. 1 is an overview in real time: as pressure drops in the vacuum, liquid nitrogen first boils then freezes.
Img. 2 & 3 show liquid nitrogen boiling.
Img. 4 shows liquid nitrogen freezing.
Img. 5 & 6 show the frozen nitrogen abruptly and quickly restructuring into a more compact configuration, similar to snowflakes.

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humanoidhistory:

DOES YOUR LABORATORY GLOW? — Workplace safety poster from the National Institutes of Health.
(National Library of Medicine)

humanoidhistory:

DOES YOUR LABORATORY GLOW? — Workplace safety poster from the National Institutes of Health.

(National Library of Medicine)

(via scientificillustration)

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compoundchem:

A look at the chemistry behind the colours of various gemstones; read more & see a larger version of the graphic here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-lj

compoundchem:

A look at the chemistry behind the colours of various gemstones; read more & see a larger version of the graphic here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-lj

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humanoidhistory:

A 1951 Chinese public health poster warns us about the dangers of poop.
(National Library of Medicine)

humanoidhistory:

A 1951 Chinese public health poster warns us about the dangers of poop.

(National Library of Medicine)

(via scientificillustration)

Photoset

mindfuckmath:

This Is What Math Equations Look Like in 3-D

Some beautiful photos of 3-dimensional models of math equations made by mathematicians in the 1880s.  Click on the link for more.  

(via visualizingmath)

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generalelectric:

At GE Global Research, a tube of almost pure quartz is heated to temperatures of around 1,700 degrees Celsius to create custom laboratory glassware. The material is then molded and tailored specifically to the experiment it’s being created for.

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"In this page from Dr. Peter Novick’s lab notebook, he shows the data that clinched the discovery [of protein secretion which led to the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2013], proving that the mutant strain accumulated enzymes inside the cell that it normally would have secreted past the membrane.” Via (Paywall).

"In this page from Dr. Peter Novick’s lab notebook, he shows the data that clinched the discovery [of protein secretion which led to the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2013], proving that the mutant strain accumulated enzymes inside the cell that it normally would have secreted past the membrane.” Via (Paywall).

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skunkbear:

s-c-i-guy:

Zebrafish embryo
Just 22 hours after fertilization, this zebrafish embryo is already taking shape. By 36 hours, all of the major organs will have started to form. The zebrafish’s rapid growth and see-through embryo make it ideal for scientists studying how organs develop.
Image courtesy of Philipp Keller, Bill Lemon, Yinan Wan and Kristin Branson, Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, Va. Part of the exhibit Life:Magnified by ASCB and NIGMS.
source

beautiful!

skunkbear:

s-c-i-guy:

Zebrafish embryo

Just 22 hours after fertilization, this zebrafish embryo is already taking shape. By 36 hours, all of the major organs will have started to form. The zebrafish’s rapid growth and see-through embryo make it ideal for scientists studying how organs develop.

Image courtesy of Philipp Keller, Bill Lemon, Yinan Wan and Kristin Branson, Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, Va. Part of the exhibit Life:Magnified by ASCB and NIGMS.

source

beautiful!

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schornacklab:

Not Pacman - a bursting spore of the arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus Rhizophagus irregularis - releasing oil droplets. Picture: Ruth Le Fevre

schornacklab:

Not Pacman - a bursting spore of the arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus Rhizophagus irregularis - releasing oil droplets. Picture: Ruth Le Fevre

(via science-junkie)

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(Source: skapunkalypse)

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skunkbear:

The evil geniuses at NASA Ames Research Center are trying to create super intelligent soccer balls with a top-secret vaporized serum! … er … wait, no. They’re just studying the aerodynamics of the official World Cup ball - the “Brazuca.”

Geoff Brumfiel has the full story here.

Football fluid dynamics is a touchy subject on the international stage. Goalies hated the 2010 World Cup’s ball (the too-smooth “Jabulani”) because it was said to swerve and twist in the air. Joe Palca covered that story four years ago.

NPR: covering ball aerodynamics since 1971.

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bad-postcards:

HOLY THERMOMETER
Let’s Break the Record Next Sunday

bad-postcards:

HOLY THERMOMETER

Let’s Break the Record Next Sunday

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"Respiratory events such as exhalations or  more violent coughs and sneezes are key in transferring respiratory diseases between infectious and susceptible individuals. We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the fluid dynamics of such violent expiratory events. Direct observation reveals that such flows are multiphase turbulent buoyant clouds with suspended droplets of various sizes. Our observations guide the development of an accompanying theoretical model in which pathogen-bearing droplets interact with a turbulent buoyant momentum puff. The  range of validity of our theoretical model is explored experimentally. Our study highlights the importance of the multiphase nature of respiratory clouds in extending the range of respiratory pathogens." John Bush.

"Respiratory events such as exhalations or  more violent coughs and sneezes are key in transferring respiratory diseases between infectious and susceptible individuals. We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the fluid dynamics of such violent expiratory events. Direct observation reveals that such flows are multiphase turbulent buoyant clouds with suspended droplets of various sizes. Our observations guide the development of an accompanying theoretical model in which pathogen-bearing droplets interact with a turbulent buoyant momentum puff. The  range of validity of our theoretical model is explored experimentally. Our study highlights the importance of the multiphase nature of respiratory clouds in extending the range of respiratory pathogens." John Bush.

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"The dynamics of fluid-filled Tibetan bowls was the  research subject of Denis Terwagne during his internship in the Applied Math Lab. Our combined experimental and theoretical investigation elucidated the manner in which the rubbing of the bowl excites its resonant wave modes, which in turn excite Faraday waves on the fluid surface that may break, giving rise to the ejection of droplets that bounce in place or skip across the free surface.” John Bush.

"The dynamics of fluid-filled Tibetan bowls was the  research subject of Denis Terwagne during his internship in the Applied Math Lab. Our combined experimental and theoretical investigation elucidated the manner in which the rubbing of the bowl excites its resonant wave modes, which in turn excite Faraday waves on the fluid surface that may break, giving rise to the ejection of droplets that bounce in place or skip across the free surface.” John Bush.