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Tags: fashion
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wepinkprimitives:

Saturntable by Nicebleed

wepinkprimitives:

Saturntable by Nicebleed

(via skewedneutral)

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threadless:

Straight off the intergalactic turnpike, “Space Traffic" by Alex Solis is our newest sublimation tee!

If you’re digging this all-over design, all of our sublimation tees are 30% off!

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shirtigo:

Ode to the Cosmos
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naturegraphics:

THE ROAD MOST TAKEN

Background: This week we published a paper that defines the optimal path through quantum space. In short: classical systems are unmoved when a measurement is performed. Not so quantum systems, where continuous monitoring can direct the quantum state along a random path. The authors have tracked the quantum trajectories in a qubit, consisting of two aluminum paddles connected by a tunable Josephson junction deposited on silicon.

The team managed to determine which of the possible paths between an initial and a final quantum state is the most probable and show that these ‘optimal paths’ are in agreement with the route predicted by theory, a quantum relative of the principle of least action that defines the correct path linking two points in space and time in classical mechanics.

As well as giving insights into the interplay between measurement dynamics and evolution of a system, this work opens up new possibilities for first-principles synthesis of control sequences for complex quantum systems and in information processing. 

Design challenge: This striking visualisation was created by Kater Murch, one of the authors of the paper. It shows individual quantum trajectories, with the whole showing ‘optimal paths.’ The starkness of the many white trajectory lines on a black background immediately drew our attention, and we asked the team to work with us on a cover.

Specifically, we asked Murch if he wouldn’t mind experimenting with various colour patterns, to see how it might affect the ability to see the optimal paths (see bottom image) but in the end we decided that the random colours actually made it more difficult to see the overall result, and stayed with the original black and white.

-Kelly Krause

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(Source: fetuskid)

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(Source: textless)

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thegildedcentury:

Amazing Stories, December, 1938

thegildedcentury:

Amazing Stories, December, 1938

(via thegildedcentury)

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nevver:

I feel fine/nothing
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swagtron4000:

sorry sir, we don’t have the facilities for a cat scan, but we can certainly get you a lab report

swagtron4000:

sorry sir, we don’t have the facilities for a cat scan, but we can certainly get you a lab report

(Source: bobasprite, via caite)

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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dillon Marsh

For What’s it’s Worth

These images combine photography and computer generated elements in an effort to visualise the output of a mine. The CGI objects represent a scale model of the materials removed from the mine, a solid mass occupying a scene which shows the ground from which it was extracted. By doing so, the intention is to create a kind of visualisation of the merits and shortfalls of mining in South Africa, an industry that has shaped the history and economy of the country so radically.
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scienceisbeauty:

Chicken, eggs, tomatoes and pinapple, I never would have thought that this blog would feature rotten food. But even there you can find (some) beauty (especially because the Internet not transmit the smell).

Over a period of nine months, fine art photographer Klaus Pichler turned the bathroom of his studio apartment into a curated collection of plastic containers, each containing food items available to the average citizen of industrialized Europe.

Full history at National Geographic: Visualizing Waste: Klaus Pichler’s Gorgeous, Rotting Food.

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explore-blog:

A visual compendium of bioluminescent creatures by Seattle-based artist Eleanor Lutz, reminiscent of Ernest Haeckel’s pioneering drawings from the early 1900s. Also available as a poster.
Pair with the first poem published in a scientific journal, an ode to bioluminescence. 
(via Visually)

explore-blog:

A visual compendium of bioluminescent creatures by Seattle-based artist Eleanor Lutz, reminiscent of Ernest Haeckel’s pioneering drawings from the early 1900s. Also available as a poster.

Pair with the first poem published in a scientific journal, an ode to bioluminescence

(via Visually)

(Source: explore-blog)