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laughingsquid:

‘Smoke’, Intriguing Patterns in Cigarette Smoke Selected From 100,000 Photos
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“Once you have a collider, every problem starts to look like a particle.” New Yorker cartoon by Adam Cooper and Mat Barton.

“Once you have a collider, every problem starts to look like a particle.” New Yorker cartoon by Adam Cooper and Mat Barton.

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Naturally occurring sea shell patterns similar to those generated by cellular automata (Conus textileConus aulicus, Oliva porphyria, Lioconcha castrensis).

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michaelshillingburg:

Stellar!
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nevver:

Anatomically correct
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compoundchem:

This year’s Longitude Prize is focused on the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria. They’ve put together a nice image, shown here, which showcases what they term ‘the ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria’. You can read more detail on each of them here:http://www.nesta.org.uk/news/antibiotic-resistant-bacteriaThe prize offers a £10 million prize fund for the development of a cheap, accurate, and easy to use bacterial infection test kit, which will allow doctors to prescribe the correct antibiotics at the correct time for patients, to try to help minimise the development of antibiotic resistance.

compoundchem:

This year’s Longitude Prize is focused on the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria. They’ve put together a nice image, shown here, which showcases what they term ‘the ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria’. You can read more detail on each of them here:http://www.nesta.org.uk/news/antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

The prize offers a £10 million prize fund for the development of a cheap, accurate, and easy to use bacterial infection test kit, which will allow doctors to prescribe the correct antibiotics at the correct time for patients, to try to help minimise the development of antibiotic resistance.

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sciencefictiongallery:

Angus McKie - Power to the People, 1983.

sciencefictiongallery:

Angus McKie - Power to the People, 1983.

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"Atomic structure of the 50S, the larger subunit of the 70S ribosome of prokaryotes, from Haloarcula marismortui. Proteins are shown in blue and the two RNA chains in orange and yellow. The small patch of green in the center of the subunit is the active site”, by David S. Goodsell.

Haloarcula on Ivory”, part of a series called No Original Research, by Evan Roth.

Tags: gif science art
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thekidshouldseethis:

Plants and animals (including humans) live, eat, reproduce, and die within these food webs, helping to create balance or instability the habitats that they live in. This push and pull for balance, in any biome, is made of positive and negative feedback loops. It’s sort of like an orchestra…
Watch the video: Feedback loops: How nature gets its rhythms.

thekidshouldseethis:

Plants and animals (including humans) live, eat, reproduce, and die within these food webs, helping to create balance or instability the habitats that they live in. This push and pull for balance, in any biome, is made of positive and negative feedback loops. It’s sort of like an orchestra…

Watch the video: Feedback loops: How nature gets its rhythms.

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fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The mystery of the roaming rocks of Death Valley’s Racetrack Playa may be at an end. Since their discovery in the 1940s, researchers have speculated about what conditions on the playa could cause 15+ kg rocks to slide tens or hundreds of meters across the dry lakebed. But the rare nature of the movement and the remoteness of the location had prevented direct observation of the phenomenon until last December when a research team caught the rocks in motion (see the timelapse animation above or the source video). Winter rain and snow had created a shallow ice-encrusted pond across the playa by the time the researchers arrived to check their previously installed equipment. Late one sunny morning, the melting ice, only millimeters thick, cracked into plates tens of meters wide and began to move under the light breeze (~4-5 m/s). Despite its windowpane-like thickness, the ice pushed GPS-instrumented rocks up to hundreds of meters at speeds of 2-5 m/min. It took just the right mix of conditions—sun, wind, snow, and water—but the two ice-shoving instances the team observed go a long way toward explaining the sailing rocks. (Image credits: R. Norris et al.; J. Norris, source video; NASA Goddard; via Discover and SciAm)

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The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was awarded jointly to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy". These images captured with stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, one of the numerous nanoscopy techniques pioneered by these scientists. Depicted is a "vimentin network of mammalian cell" and three images comparing traditional confocal microscopy with STED in ”HeLA cells”.

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turquoisebird:

My veterinarian sent me this X-ray image of a pregnant mama cat brought into his clinic. Six kittens.

turquoisebird:

My veterinarian sent me this X-ray image of a pregnant mama cat brought into his clinic. Six kittens.

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(Source: glumshoe, via softgabber)